Failed VP is caught in an IDIOTIC lie and liberal media covers it up!

What better news to fact-check than one that capitalizes words and attacks people and political parties in just the headline alone?

Screenshot (22) The second I saw this one from The Federalist Papers Project, I knew I had struck gold. In this article, Calvin Freiburger attacks both Tim Kaine as well as Obamacare itself, claiming that both are wrapped up in countless lies and fraud. This idea is based around an op-ed written by a man named Jon Decker–stating that senators such as Tim Kaine are exempt from paying Obamacare–as well as the response from Kaine himself.

My first move in determining just how true or false this claim is was to check out the website itself. With no former knowledge myself about this website, I decided to check  out Wikipedia; however, the only result I was rewarded with was one regarding the actual, historical, Federalist Papers. In that case, I decided to instead read laterally to see what other websites were saying about this one. Before I even got done typing in “The federalist papers project” into Google though, I was already coming up with searches regarding this being fake news, as well as a Snopes search.

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Checking out the snopes result, I found 3 previous fact-checks from The Federalist Papers Project, with two of them being false and only one, true. Just to check, I typed in the title of this article in the snopes search bar, but didn’t come up with a fact-check on it.

Going back to Google, I searched “thefederalistpaper.org -site:thefederalistpaper.org”, went three pages in, and could not find one result from a reputable source. There was; however, information about this site from other websites unknown to me.

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Note the information underneath the first and last results.

The idea that this website is “right-winged” does seem true anyways, though, considering its content (“liberal media covers it up”).

Since, based on the snopes search, this website seems to provide more fake than real news, I went back to the original article to go upstream and try to find original source for this information. The first link is one to an op-ed piece by American Commitment membership director Jon Decker in The Roanoak Times. Since this website is mentioned more than once throughout the article, I decided to fact-check it. From Wikipedia, I discovered that it is the primary newspaper for Virginia, and there is no further information for this being a bias new source. However, the fact that it is solely based on Virginia and nowhere else in the U.S. leads me to believe that it at least has some sort of bias. Also, reading through it, I found that there were no links to other sources and although there are “facts” included, there isn’t really a way to know just from this source if they’re true. Even the way it is written suggests an opinionated point of view.

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Further down in the original article, there is another link, this time to an article on The Federalist about the exchange between Tim Kaine and Jon Deker, linking both to the op-ed mentioned before and then Kaine’s response. In this article, though, the first sentence states that Jon Decker, the one who wrote the original op-ed piece, is “one of us”, as in a partner of The Federalist website. Along with this, their only defense of Jon Decker’s piece is to attack a Politifact article that Tim Kaine used in his response,

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and provide a screenshot of a Twitter post showing a slight change in Tim Kaine’s article on The Roanoke Times. The article in The Federalist Papers Project also used this Twitter post as their argument.

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First of all, the person who Tweeted this, Phil Kerpen, is himself a colleague of Jon Decker, exposing his bias, as well as the bias of The Federalist website.

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Second of all, the idea that attacking Politifact is a valid argument is false in itself, considering we know that Politifact is a reliable fact-checking website.

And if we need anymore proof, typing “Tim Kaine caught in idiotic Obamacare lie” into google provides me with only two results: one from The Federalist Papers Project, and the other from The Federalist.

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Is seems very possible that, based on the Twitter post, Kaine made a mistake in his description and it was simply edited to fix it? However, in the main argument surrounding the idea that “Obama ‘just granted all of Congress an exception’ to Obamacare”, we can all see that this is false based on Politifact, leading Calvin Freiburger’s article on The Federalist Papers Project to be false as well.

[draft] Failed VP is caught in an IDIOTIC lie and liberal media covers it up!

What better news to fact-check than one that capitalizes words and attacks people and political parties in just the headline alone?

Screenshot (22) The second I saw this one from The Federalist Papers Project, I knew I had struck gold.

My first move in determining just how true or false this claim is was to check out the website itself. With no former knowledge myself about this website, I decided to check  out Wikipedia; however, the only result I was rewarded with was one regarding the actual, historical, Federalist Papers. In that case, I decided to instead read laterally to see what other websites were saying about this one. Before I even got done typing in “The federalist papers project” into Google though, I was already coming up with searches regarding this being fake news, as well as a snopes search.

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Checking out the snopes result, I found 3 previous fact-checks from The Federalist Papers Project, with two of them being false and only one, true. Just to check, I typed in the title of this article in the snopes search bar, but didn’t come up with a fact-check on it.

Going back to Google, I searched “thefederalistpaper.org -site:thefederalistpaper.org”, went three pages in, and could not find one result from a reputable source. There was; however, information on the site from other websites unknown to me, though the idea that this website is “right-winged” seems true considering its content (“liberal media covers it up”).

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Note the information underneath the first and last results.

Since, based on the snopes search, this website seems to provide more fake than real news, I went back to the original article to go upstream and try to find original source for this information. The first link is one to an op-ed piece by American Commitment membership director Jon Decker in The Roanoak Times. Since this website is mentioned more than once throughout the article, I decided to fact-check it. From Wikipedia, I discovered that it is the primary newspaper for Virginia, and there is no further information for this being a bias new source; however, the fact that it is solely based on Virginia and nowhere else in the U.S. leads me to believe that I might have to look further into this piece. Also, reading through it, I found that there were no links to other sources and although there are “facts” included, there isn’t really a way to know just from this source if they’re true. Even the way it is written suggests an opinionated point of view.

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Further down in the original article, there is another link, this time to an article on The Federalist about the exchange between Tim Kaine and Jon Deker, linking both to the op-ed mentioned before and then Kaine’s response, which uses a Politifact article proving that the claim of “Obama ‘just granted all of Congress an exception’ to Obamacare” is false.

 

 

Truthometer list

  1. “Is coffee healthy for you? What new research says.” – Fox Carolina. Just the idea alone that coffee could be good for you led me to add this as a possible article to fact check. Since I don’t drink coffee, I was interested to see what was being said about it and in what way it could be considered “healthy.” What caught my eye first when clicking on this link, though, was the fact that the study and research done is mentioned but there are no links and no information whatsoever on where it came form. I am led to believe that this would be a good article for the truthometer since there would most likely be a lot of controversy about this because of the divide between those who love coffee and will believe anything positive about it, and those who don’t and would be skeptical.
  2. “Breaking: McConnel says republicans are giving up latest Obamacare repeal bill.”-The Gateway Pundit. This is the first time I am seeing an article like this and, although that may be due to my personal social media bubble, I would think that something with a topic like this would be showing up more in the news. The bias website alone is something that can be fact checked, so why not do the same for the article? The fact that it’s “breaking” news also leads me to believe this is dramatized, so even if it does end up to be true, there will most likely be false parts of what is being said.
  3. “Failed VP Candidate Tim Kaine caught in IDIOTIC Obamacare lie, and liberal media covers it up.”- The Federalist Papers. First of all, the title of the article itself is just a mess, from deeming Tim Kaine a “failed candidate”, to the bolding of “Idiotic”, to firing at liberal media. Considering this also comes from a bias website, I would want to first of all find out if the lie that the article is based around is actually a lie at all. By looking at how the liberal media, as well as the conservative media, covered this news, and then seeing what is said about it on more reliable websites, I could definitely get a good fact check out of this one. It seems that this article is one that I could use a good amount of fact checking techniques on to get to the actual truth of it.

Studies show…

According to an article on tuscon.com, “New science suggests yoga reduces depression.”

screenshot-15.pngAlthough this seems like a valid argument to make, I still wanted to, first, see if the article included a link to the study that provided this information, and then decide whether or not it’s reliable.

There were a few links right from the beginning; one to a yoga studio’s website, another to a press release from the American Psychological Association, and a study by Harvard and Columbia researchers. I first clicked on the study to find that it was from the website pubmed.gov; however the study is found in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine since pubmed is only the database website. Looking up its impact factor on google, I found that this journal has an impact factor of 1.395. Based on Caulfield’s readings, a journal is a fairly reputable source if it has an impact factor above 1.

 

From there, I decided to go to the next step and look up the authors. On the study that the original article linked to, the author’s names are linked to a search for other articles or studies they have worked on. The number of search results varied for each person, some having 20, some only 8, and other a whopping 400. Just to double check, though, I went to google scholar and typed in some of their names.

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From this, we can see that CC Streeter has a background with studies concerning yoga and it’s affect on the brain.

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These other two authors also check out; Silveri MM has done an extensive amount of scientific research and studies in general, and Gerbarg PL has experience with research on anxiety and derpression. Based on this, it seems reasonable to believe that both pubmed.gov, and this study are viable sources.

I then went back to the original article and clicked on the link for the papers presented at the American Psychological Association’s convention. This link led me to a press release article on their website about yoga’s effectiveness at reducing depression. I looked up the website’s impact factor and again, found nothing. I also noticed that there was no author(s) listen in the beginning of this article, which I found strange. As I scrolled downto the bottom, though, I noticed that they had four people listed at the bottom with their emails and phone numbers, as well as a short write up about the association.

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Again, I brought up google scholar and looked up each of these names. For Lindsey Hopkins, the first result led me to her google profile with a list of articles underneath. Maren Nyer’s result provided various articles that she was a co-author of, as well as Nina Vollbehr’s, while Jabob Hyde’s results only listed one or two articles.

Based on the author’s credibility and the brief description of the APA, it seems that, once again, this is a reliable article.